James Martel, President

is Professor in and Chair of the Department of Political Science. He teaches courses in political theory, continental philosophy and theories of gender and sexuality. He is the author of four books: Divine Violence: Walter Benjamin and the Eschatology of Sovereignty (Routledge/GlassHouse 2011);Textual Conspiracies: Walter Benjamin, Idolatry and Political Theory (Michigan, 2011); Subverting the Leviathan: Reading Thomas Hobbes as a Radical Democrat (Columbia, 2007); and Love is a Sweet Chain: Desire, Autonomy and Friendship in Liberal Political Theory (Routledge, 2001). He is also co-editor, along with Jimmy Casas Klausen (University of Wisconsin, Madison) of How not to be Governed: Readings and Interpretations from a Critical Anarchist Left (Lexington, 2011). He is also the author of many essays, encyclopedia entries, book chapters and book reviews (for CV, see link above). He is currently working on two new book projects: When Anarchism was Young: Retrieving early 20th Century Spanish Radicalism as a Way of Life and The One and Only Law: Walter Benjamin and the Second Commandment.

 
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Sarah Higinbotham, Treasurer, English, Georgia Institute of Technology

teaches at a men’s prison outside Atlanta and volunteers with an Atlanta nonprofit that benefits children with an incarcerated parent. Sarah's PhD is in early modern literature and my scholarship centers around the intersections of literature and law. She has written about the violence of the law in early modern England, critical prison theory, and human rights in children’s literature. Sarah's publications appear in Law, Culture, and the Humanities, Columbia Human Rights Law Review, Contemporary Justice Review, The Social History of Crime and Punishment in the United States, Wake Forest Law Review, and Reading Milton, and she has a book forthcoming from Oxford University Press (Human Rights and Children’s Literature: Imagination and the Narrative of Law). Sarah is also the co-director of the nonprofit Common Good Atlanta, which seeks to connect the humanities to the community.

 


Austin Sarat, Editor, Law, Culture, and the Humanities

is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College. Professor Sarat was recognized with the 2011 Lasting Contribution Award, awarded by the American Political Science Association's section on Lawand Courts "for a book or journal article, 10 years or older, that has made a lasting impression on the field of law and courts” for his piece "The Emergence of Transformation of Disputes: Naming, Blaming, Claiming". 


Clifford Rosky, Treasurer

is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Utah’s S.J. Quinney College of Law.  Before joining the faculty, he served as a research fellow for the Williams Institute on Sexual Orientation Law & Public Policy at the UCLA School of Law.  Professor Rosky’s research is focused on discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender parents and children. His work has been published in the Yale Journal of Law & Feminism, the Arizona Law Review, and the Buffalo Law Review.  Two of his articles have received UCLA’s prestigious Dukeminier Award, which recognizes the best articles published each year on sexual orientation and gender identity law, and a third article was recently featured on Jotwell, a peer-edited online journal that serves to identify and celebrate the best new legal scholarship in any field.

 


Susan Heinzelman, Listserv Moderator

is Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas and Director of the Centre for Women's and Gender Studies. Professor Heinzelman has published extensively on law and literature and gender, most recently with Stanford University Press: Riding the Black Ram: Law, Literature, and Gender (2010).


Stacy Douglas, Webmaster

is Assistant Professor in Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University. Professor Douglas's interest in law and legal studies is fuelled by broad questions about theories of democracy, the role of the state, the relationship between government and governed, and processes of decolonisation. Her work has appeared in Law and Critique, Feminist Legal Studies, Theory & Event, Radical Philosophy, among other academic and non-academic publications.

 


Simon Stern, 2016 Program Committee Chair, Law, University of Toronto

is an Associate Professor & Co-Director, Centre for Innovation Law & Policy at the University of Toronto. Simon teaches and researches in the areas of civil procedure, law and literature, legal history, and criminal law.  His research focuses on the evolution of legal doctrines and methods in relation to literary and intellectual history. Current research topics include the development of the "reasonable man" standard (and its precursors and analogues) since the eighteenth century, and the changing conception of legal fictions between the renaissance and the present. He is co-chair of the Critical Analysis of Law Workshop, and is co-editor of Critical Analysis of Law. His research has been funded by SSHRC and the Foundation for Legal Research.

 


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Susan Schmeiser 2016 Host Committee Chair,Law, University of Connecticut 

holds a Ph.D. in English literature from Brown University, where she spent five years as a teaching assistant and advanced teaching fellow, and a J.D. from Yale Law School, focuses her scholarship on issues at the intersection of law and mental health, including the evidentiary status of psychotherapeutic material; the role of unconscious guilt in criminal behavior and punishment; the problem of sexuality and self-control in mid-twentieth-century law and medicine; and the challenges confronting mental health experts when prisoners who face the death penalty seek to halt their appeals and embrace execution. She has exhibited her unique interdisciplinary approach to the law as a presenter at numerous colleges and universities, including Johns Hopkins, Princeton University, Cardozo Law School, Harvard Law School, UCLA Law School, USC Gould School of Law, and the University of Virginia School of Law, as well as at the annual meetings of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture and the Humanities, the Law and Society Association, the International Academy of Law and Mental Health, the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Law and Society, the American Society of Criminology, and the Modern Language Association. From 2010-2012 she served as associate dean for student life at UConn Law. 


Mark Antaki, Co-chair, Graduate Conference Committee, Law, McGill University

is an Associate Professor at McGill University's Faculty of Law. He graduated from McGill in 1996 under the National Programme with a B.C.L. and an LL.B. He has a Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California, Berkeley. His doctoral thesis undertook a "Genealogy of Crimes Against Humanity". Mark's areas of interest include Public law and international law, Political and legal theory, and History of ideas.

 


Linda Ross Meyer, Co-chair, Graduate Conference Committee, Law, Quinnipiac University

joined the School of Law Faculty at Quinnipiac University in 1994 from Vanderbilt Law School, where she taught for two years after clerking for Justice Sandra Day O'Connor at the United States Supreme Court. Her publications and interests are primarily in criminal law and legal theory and she is the author of The Justice of Mercy (Univ. Mich. Press, 2010). She enjoys hiking, birding, kayaking, playing tennis, singing, and writing for children.


Paul Berman, Law, George Washington University

is a Professor of Law at George Washington University and is one of the world’s foremost theorists on the effect of globalization on the interactions among legal systems. He is the author of nearly fifty scholarly works, including Global Legal Pluralism: A Jurisprudence of Law Beyond Borders, published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. He was also among the first legal scholars to focus on legal issues regarding online activity, and he is co-author of one of the leading casebooks in the field.


William MacNeil, Law, Griffith University

is a professor at the Griffith School of Law. He served as Dean and Head of School of the Griffith Law School from 2010 to 2014. He is a scholar of jurisprudence and cultural legal studies, having published widely in both fields. His first book, Lex Populi: The Jurisprudence of Popular Culture, was published by Stanford University Press in 2007. Bill's second book, Novel Judgements: Legal Theory as Fiction was published by Routledge (London) in 2011. A Canadian by birth, Bill holds three degrees in law (Dalhousie, University College London and Columbia), and two in literature (Toronto). Previously he worked and/or taught at the Department of Law, London School of Economics and the Faculty of Law, University of Hong Kong.


Keally McBride, Politics, Peace and Justice Studies, University of San Francisco

is a Professor at the University of San Francisco and the director of Legal Studies and 4/3 Law. He has taught in the Politics Department at USF since 1989. He founded the USF Legal Studies and the Peace & Justice Studies programs, and now coordinates the Legal Studies, Criminal Justice Studies, and the 4+3 Law programs. He teaches in the Honors Humanities and the BA/MA in International Studies programs. He's a Pre–Law Advisory Program member and advises the Student Pre–Law Society. Elias received the Sarlo Prize for teaching in 2006, the Frank L. Beach Award for Leadership in Service in 2001, and the USF Distinguished Research Award in 1996.  

 


Panu Minkkinen, Law, University of Helsinki

is a Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Helsinki. Before joining the staff at Helsinki, he was Professor of Legal Theory at the University of Leicester, UK, from 2004 to 2011. From 2001 to 2004, Panu worked at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, an interdisciplinary research institute, as Deputy-Director and Fellow, and prior to that he served a three year term as Director of the Finnish Institute in London, a charitable trust advancing cultural and academic co-operation between Finland and the UK and Ireland. He is involved in the editorial work of two international journals both reflecting his personal research interests: Law and Critique (published by Springer), and Law, Culture and the Humanities (published by Sage). His research work is guided by a dedication to interdisciplinary approaches to law and international collaboration. Panu's current research projects deal with constitutional theory and law as a human science. 


 

Jill Stauffer, Philosophy, Peace, Justice and Human Rights, Haverford College

before going to Haverford College to create a new interdisciplinary human rights theory program for undergraduates, Jill Stauffer taught at Amherst College in Massachusetts in the department of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought, and in the Philosophy department at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/CUNY in New York. Stauffer is on the Board of Directors for the non-profit book series Voice of Witness, which illuminates human rights crises through the stories of the men and women who live through them. Her academic interests include philosophy of law, political philosophy, continental philosophy, and ethics. She has published widely on the international reach of rights, personal and political responsibility, political reconciliation, and the rule of law. Her edited volume, Nietzsche and Levinas: After the Death of a Certain God, was published by Columbia University Press in 2009. Her book Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard was published by Columbia University Press in 2015.

 

Karin van Marle, Law, University of Pretoria
 

is a Professor at the University of Pretoria and holds the degrees BLC LLB (UP) LLM LLD (Unisa). Professor van Marle worked as lecturer at UNISA, Department of Jurisprudence from 1997 to 1998 and was appointed in the Department of Legal History as senior lecturer in 1999. She was promoted to Associate Professor in 2002 and to Professor in 2004. Professor van Marle teaches Jurisprudence 311 and Jurisprudence 420 at undergraduate level. She convenes the LLM in Law and Political Justice that is offered in collaboration with Birkbeck Law School, University of London. The core modules of the programme are Philosophy and history of human rights, Post-apartheid jurisprudence and Global perspectives on law, rights and development.


Karl Shoemaker, President, Political Science, San Francisco State University
Austin Sarat, Editor, Law, Culture and Humanities, Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought, Amherst College 

Sarah Higinbotham, Treasurer, English, Georgia Institute of Technology

Genevieve Painter, Webmaster, Law, McGill University 
Susan Heinzelman, Listserv Moderator, English and Women's Studies, University of Texas

Susan Schmeiser, 2016 Host Committee Chair,Law, University of Connecticut
Simon Stern, 2016 Program Committee Chair, Law, University of Toronto
Mark Antaki, Co-chair, Graduate Conference Committee, Law, McGill University
Linda Ross Meyer, Co-chair, Graduate Conference Committee, Law, Quinnipiac University
Paul Berman, Law, George Washington University

Sara Kendall, Law, University of Kent
William MacNeil, Law, Griffith University
Keally McBride, Politics, Peace and Justice Studies, University of San Francisco
Panu Minkkinen, Law, University of Helsinki
Jill Stauffer, Philosophy, Peace, Justice and Human Rights, Haverford College
Karin van Marle, Law, University of Pretoria